In new article, Pediatrician Dr. Kenneth Rebong explains the Hand-Foot-And-Mouth Disease

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

The hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a contagious disease mostly targeting young children. Dr. Kenneth P. Rebong explains it.

Kenneth Pomar Rebong, MD (N/A:N/A)


The hand-foot-and-mouth disease chiefly affects children aged 10 and younger, with infants being the most common targets … vulnerable are also the elderly with weak immune systems”

— Dr. Kenneth P Rebong, pediatrician

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, June 25, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — The hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a mild but highly infectious viral disease, mostly diagnosed among children aged 10 and under. One of its most distinctive features is the characteristic red sores that appear in the mouth and the painless rashes on the hands and the feet. This disease has no specific treatment or medication or even any vaccine. It can only be prevented by strictly following certain preventive measures.

Dr. Kenneth Rebong has published an overview article on this disease. The complete article will be published on the Blog of Dr. Rebong at https://drkennethrebong.wordpress.com/

Symptoms

The HFMD has certain distinguishing signs and symptoms that help identify the virus easily. These indicators include:
* Mild fever with a sore throat
* Malaise
* Painful red lesions on the tongue, gums and the cheek lining
* Non-itching red rashes and patches with blisters on the palms, foot soles and the hips
* Irritability and frustration
* Loss of appetite
The incubation period for HDMD lasts from three to six days with a fever and a sore throat being the initial signs, mostly. A couple of days after the onset of the initial symptoms, painful sores and rashes start developing on the hands and feet and in the mouth.

An infected person is highly contagious all through the first week of the infection. In fact, even after the initial symptoms disappear, your child may still be infectious.

Causes

The hand-foot-and-mouth disease is caused by the cox sackie A16 virus. This virus is a member of the non-polio enteroviruses group. Viruses of this particular group mostly enter the body via oral ingestion where contaminated hands or objects enter the mouth and infect the person with the hand-foot-and-mouth disease. Other causes include:
* Nasal secretions or throat discharge
* Saliva and Stool
* Fluid oozing from blisters
* Respiratory droplets sprayed into the air via coughing or sneezing

Risk factors

The hand-foot-and-mouth disease chiefly affects children aged 10 and younger, with infants being the most common targets. One of the most vulnerable people are the elderly with weak immune systems and children in crowded places like child centers and schools where the infection can easily spread by physical contact.

Complications

The HFMD can also lead to certain complications if not treated promptly or adequately. One of the most common implications is dehydration, which may consequently cause mouth and throat sores and mouth ulcers, causing pain and difficulty while swallowing. Another, rather rare, complication is the cox sackie virus, which primarily involves the brain and the nervous system and at times leads to further complications such as viral meningitis and encephalitis.

Prevention

Currently, there is no specific vaccine for the hand-foot-and-mouth disease but some precautionary measures can help reduce the risks of being infected by HFMD, like:
* Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly to prevent the virus and the infection from spreading to other people.
* Isolate infected people by quarantining them in a secluded area to avoid other people from contracting the viral infection
* Avoid exposure and physical contact especially with babies, infants and people with compromised immune systems.
* Practice good hygiene by showering daily and not putting any objects, finger or your hands in your mouth.
* Disinfect your things and keep them clean, especially items like bed linen, toiletries, toys and utensils. Also, disinfect common areas like living room, kitchen, bathrooms etc.
* Avoid sharing glasses, cutlery and other items that may spread the virus
* Avoid smoking

On suspicions of your child suffering from HFMD, it is best to consult your child’s physician immediately, advises Dr. Rebong.

Kenneth Pomar Rebong, MD

Dr. Kenneth P. Rebong, a medical doctor in San Jose, California, specializes in Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. The scope of his practice is from age 0 to 21. He graduated from FEUNRMF University in Manila, Philippines and completed his residency at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.

References

Blog: https://drkennethrebong.wordpress.com/
News: https://hype.news/dr-kenneth-pomar-rebong/
https://medicogazette.com/dr-kenneth-pomar-rebong
https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-kenneth-pomar-rebong
https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenneth-pomar-rebong-md-4484a938/

Kenneth Pomar Rebong, MD
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Source: EIN Presswire